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  • Have you taken the shark quiz?
    Heat Retention Quiz
    by Dennis K. Graver
    True
    False
  • A calm, relaxed scuba diver who breathes slowly retains more heat than an excited, nervous diver who breathes rapidly.
  • True
    False
  • A submerged, chilled scuba diver can produce and retain excess body heat by exercising vigorously.
  • True
    False
  • The water warmed by a body inside a wetsuit helps the wearer retain body heat.
  • True
    False
  • A diver retains more heat with the head properly insulated than with the upper and lower legs insulated.
  • True
    False
  • Hand coverings help retain body heat even if the wearer's hands are cold and numb.
  • True
    False
  • A one-eighth inch (2 to 3 mm) neoprene vest worn beneath a wetsuit increases body heat retention by about 16 percent.
  • True
    False
  • Measures to increase body heat retention by reducing water circulation in a wetsuit are more effective than increasing the thickness of the suit material.
  • True
    False
  • Spandex exposure suits (nylon/Lycra skins) provide 45 percent more insulation than bare skin.
  • True
    False
  • Spandex suits containing thermoplastic retain body heat about the same as Spandex suits without thermoplastic.
  • True
    False
  • Polypropylene undergarments worn beneath insulation in a drysuit retain more body heat than cotton undergarments worn beneath insulation.
  • True
    False
  • Wet wool retains body heat better than wet cotton, nylon or rayon.
  • True
    False
  • Several layers of insulation retain body heat better than one thick layer of insulation.
  • True
    False
  • A person retaining excessive body heat may feel weak, dizzy and nauseous.
  • True
    False
  • It is not necessary to call EMS if an overheated person stops sweating, refuses water or vomits.
  • True
    False
  • Pre-dive cooling with water is a recommended practice to avoid excessive body heat retention.